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Is Liberty's Political Involvement Disproportionate To Their Ministry?



We pride ourselves in being the largest Christian University in the world. But this distinction is nothing more than pretentious if we have nothing ministerial to show for it. For this reason it is imperative that our hearts remain fixed on the cross, lest we find ourselves presumptuously betrothed to a contemporary of Baal.

You’re known for your politics, but what about your missional status?

As a traveling representative for Liberty University, I hear it all from everyone. This particular question, though not common, sticks out to me because it invokes the grueling tension tugged between the Great Commission and political activism. I believe it is very important for Christians to be involved in politics, but ultimately our political involvement should be centered on the bedrock of biblical truth. I hate the idea of any arm of the Church replacing their ministry with...well, anything. So when this discussion surfaces I hope to be quick to dissolve any misunderstanding. Since the announcement that President Donald Trump will be the keynote speaker at this years graduation, this discussion has surfaced once again. It's a good discussion to have because woe to us if we ever allow our gospel-mindedness to be sacrificed for our political inclinations.

I have no doubt in my mind that our ministerial pursuits far outweigh our political activism. But to be fair, my perspective is privileged with my deep involvement with LU. I can understand how an outsider may have a conflicting perception. For much of the world their view of Liberty is based in media exposure, and since ministry efforts aren't exactly incendiary topics, the media isn't likely to cover those stories. When a politician visits Convocation, media is everywhere. When a notable pastor speaks or when students collect tens of thousands of shoes to send to the Congo, the media isn't involved...and that's okay. We don't minister for exposure. We minister to help the helpless, heal the sick, and bring the salvific power of the gospel message to a broken and Hell-bound world.

If Liberty had nothing or even little to show of their gospel-mindedness then I could comfortably agree that we have become more political than missional. However, the twenty or so politicians we’ve had at Liberty in the past two years pales in comparison to the thousands of students we’ve sent out locally, domestically, and oversees to share the good news of Jesus.

Multiple times a year we send students out domestically and overseas to share the gospel.

Every Saturday students engage their local community, ministering to their needs.

We have students on stand by to embark on short notice anywhere around the world to assist with humanitarian efforts.

Earlier this semester students sent 10,000 pairs of shoes to the poverty-stricken Congo.

Those are but a few of the regular ministry events coming from this place.

It should be noted that ministry and political action are not always mutually exclusive. Sometimes political action is how we bring justice to the wicked and freedom to the oppressed (Micah 6:8.) William Wilberforce credited God with his calling to overthrow slavery in the Great Britain. Daniel, Esther, Joseph, and other biblical heroes of the faith considered it a duty to advocate Christ in their political positions– keep in mind their governments were not followers of God.

That said, Washington is saturated with Liberty University alumni and activism on the campus remains strong. Two years ago Liberty lead the March for Life in Washington D.C. advocating the genocide of abortion. While the political climate on Liberty's campus is prominently conservative, discussion from all viewpoints is welcome.

We pride ourselves in being the largest Christian University in the world. But this distinction is nothing more than pretentious if we have nothing ministerial to show for it. For this reason it is imperative that our hearts remain fixed on the cross, lest we find ourselves presumptuously betrothed to a contemporary of Baal...but I rejoice that this simply isn't the case.

For the gospel//

JWR


Hi, my name is John and I love coffee. As I write this I’m sitting in a local roastery sipping a “mudslide” espresso with cream and two and a half sugars. There are few things in life that I feel merit precise orchestration with no room for error, coffee is one of them.

My life belongs to Jesus. I am his son and He is my King. His work in my life is reason enough for my faith to be made complete. He lived to die for me so that I may be credited righteous thus I will live for Him. I believe one area that has been greatly ignored by Christians is culture and politics. We must be active in representing our faith in these communities, but not in a relativistic or compromising way. Full Bio


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